"Which soap operas are you watching this Ramadan?"
"Egypt."
Khalid Wad Albaih illustrated today’s cartoon. The joke riffs off the popularity of Egyptian soaps across the region. The holy month of Ramadan brings with it the equivalent of Christmas specials, with millions gathering around the tube to watch new programs that premiere as iftar is served. In fact, TV series are so popular that Egypt’s Armed Forces halted programming on July 26, a day of pro-military demonstrations, in order to increase turnout in public squares. For another take on the topic, read Leslie Chang’s “Soap Opera Islamists” in the New Yorker.
Albaih, a Doha-based Sudanese artist, has received much fanfare recently—and it’s greatly deserved. His lines are pithy and powerful, and his message is always a snappy one. Here’s the New York Times' profile of Albaih from June:

Lanky, with thick glasses and a nerdy air, Mr. Albaih does not look the part of a rebel.
By day, he works in multimedia for the Qatar Museum Authority here, sitting behind a 27-inch iMac screen with a Superman bobblehead doll on his desk. After hours, though, he becomes a cartoonist with an attitude, one whose online work has inspired discontented youth across the Arab world.

Stay up to date with Albaih’s illustrations by following him on Facebook and Twitter.

"Which soap operas are you watching this Ramadan?"

"Egypt."

Khalid Wad Albaih illustrated today’s cartoon. The joke riffs off the popularity of Egyptian soaps across the region. The holy month of Ramadan brings with it the equivalent of Christmas specials, with millions gathering around the tube to watch new programs that premiere as iftar is served. In fact, TV series are so popular that Egypt’s Armed Forces halted programming on July 26, a day of pro-military demonstrations, in order to increase turnout in public squares. For another take on the topic, read Leslie Chang’s “Soap Opera Islamists” in the New Yorker.

Albaih, a Doha-based Sudanese artist, has received much fanfare recently—and it’s greatly deserved. His lines are pithy and powerful, and his message is always a snappy one. Here’s the New York Times' profile of Albaih from June:

Lanky, with thick glasses and a nerdy air, Mr. Albaih does not look the part of a rebel.

By day, he works in multimedia for the Qatar Museum Authority here, sitting behind a 27-inch iMac screen with a Superman bobblehead doll on his desk. After hours, though, he becomes a cartoonist with an attitude, one whose online work has inspired discontented youth across the Arab world.

Stay up to date with Albaih’s illustrations by following him on Facebook and Twitter.

  1. thebeautifulfriend reblogged this from taweela
  2. eltayh reblogged this from themannamedreaper
  3. themannamedreaper reblogged this from oumcartoon
  4. hadota-masriya reblogged this from taweela
  5. letsflytoparis reblogged this from oumcartoon
  6. osama98 reblogged this from moody1990
  7. elphar3oniya reblogged this from masroora
  8. khartoon reblogged this from oumcartoon
  9. e-s-l-a-m reblogged this from oumcartoon
  10. all-over-the-globe reblogged this from masroora
  11. masroora reblogged this from oumcartoon
  12. oumcartoon posted this
Caricature & Comics
From Egypt,
Mother of the World

twitter.com/mideastXmidwest

view archive



any press is good press

essays

contact